Sign In Forgot Password

Simchat Torah (Hebrew: שִׂמְחַת תּוֹרָה), known as Rejoicing with the Torah, is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret (“Eighth Day of Assembly”), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei.  It is a joyous holiday that celebrates the Jewish love of Torah and study, affirming Torah as one of the pillars on which we build our lives.

As part of the celebration, the Torah scrolls are taken from the ark and carried or danced around the synagogue seven times, called hakafot. During the Torah service, the concluding section of the fifth book of the Torah, D’varim (Deuteronomy), is read, and immediately following, the opening section of Genesis, or B'reishit, is read. This practice represents the cyclical nature of the relationship between the Jewish people and the reading of the Torah.

Historically, Sh’mini Atzeret and Simchat Torah were two separate holidays (a day of reflection after the end of Sukkot and a celebration of Torah the following day). However, in Israel and in Reform congregations, which generally observe one day of holidays rather than two, Sh’mini Atzeret is observed concurrently with Simchat Torah.

Sun, September 25 2022 29 Elul 5782